What We Should Teach Our Kids About Failure

Some of the best-known people weren’t great students, including Albert Einstein, and Thomas Edison. That’s common knowledge. They are known for their fantastic level of achievement despite their pasts labeling them traditional failures.

It takes a lot to persevere in situations like those.

What did their parents think of them before their successes?

Did they hold out for the best? Maybe they encouraged them no matter what. Perhaps they chimed in with the teachers that thought they were hopeless or wastes of time.

You don’t know that your kid won’t make you proud. Some people are too unique for the system or for status quo. They don’t “fit” because they’re different.

Not fitting in isn’t a crime. Trying to force a good fit should be. It certainly hurts everyone involved.

Every person mentioned here is

School isn’t adulthood. It’s a regimented framework of habit. Adults can pretty much do what they please. They have more freedom and power. Some debate that.

We don’t teach our kids to keep thinking about their futures in spite of scholastic stumbling blocks.

We lean toward teaching them tradition as opposed to success. We also model it in how we live. Telling them they won’t make it in life because they fail a school system’s measurement is wrong.

The key may lie in finding them a subject in which to excel.

  1. Encourage them to develop their hobbies for their self-esteem.
  2. Buy them magazines and books about their interests.
  3. Take them to local and major events for those activities.
  4. Introduce them to people who have succeeded with that hobby or skill.
  5. Join clubs so they can interact with others pursuing the same.
  6. Enroll them in classes where they can hone those talents or interests.

It makes their achievement real to them.

They’re just people who happen to be our kids.