7 Reasons to Take Assessment Tests

In high school, the pressure to be decided about life looms like a cloud.

  1. “What should I do for a living?”
  2. “What should my major be?”
  3. “What kind of job should I get?”
  4. “Should I have a job, a career, or both?”
  5. “What is the difference between those?”
  6. “What if I don’t want to go to college?”
  7. “What are all of my options?”

Students are tasked with a great deal of testing, usually to determine their readiness and the school’s performance. There is one test that doesn’t get taken. It’s an assessment test.

Assessment testing is widely varied in type and purpose. The short story is that these tests help students decide what they could do for a living. Based on what they like, what they know, or what traits successful employees in a certain industry display, these tests can take the stress out of choosing majors, jobs, and careers. In other words, they test personality and skills.

The ASVAB

One well-known assessment test is the AFQT/ASVAB used for military candidates. It is a fairly thorough examination of a person’s knowledge in a number of areas. It tests for mechanical and mathematical knowledge, among other things. Each section of the test equates to a specific industry. The idea is to be assigned to the area with the best score. It almost ensures good job performance. Even better, this can be used to measure IQ. In an ideal situation, the selected military job will translate to successful civilian employment.

The different areas of the ASVAB test mechanical skill, math, science, and several other subjects. Each of those represents a group of numerous, fairly secure jobs that military members get paid to learn. This can be a boon for those with little or no work history. Career advancement can be easier as well.

Whether contracted for two years or 30, a military veteran has considerable professional knowledge compared to many civilians. The longer they served, the more they know. According to Rhett Jeppson, Associate Administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Veterans Business Development, 45% of all veterans are more inclined toward business ownership.

The Human Metrics Jung Typology Test

For those uninterested in the military, there is the Jung Typology Test http://bit.ly/J4YZCY. It pinpoints the personality type of the test taker. With that, decisions can be made about majors and jobs and careers based on the best fit for the type of person. There are four types, two of them introverted, two of them extroverted. Basically, the other factors are whether or not the person is a thinker, a judger, a sensor, a perceiver, or a feeler. Each possible combination of these aspects creates a different personality and outcome assigned to appropriate industries. Various personality tests are available at http://www.humanmetrics.com.

No Faking Necessary

Anyone can don a façade and say he plans to go to USC or become a doctor or engineer. Why USC, one of the more expensive universities, which is private, by the way? Most people don’t have the longevity or persistence to become doctors. What kind of doctor? What type of engineer? The vague answers to those questions—along the lines of “I don’t know yet”– reveal the truth, which is that it was simply talk.

Assessment tests can identify the true interests of students. People settle for good pay on jobs they hate everyday. What’s more, they are stuck in them if they have families. Despite that, why refuse to explore other possibilities? That doesn’t require quitting or taking on the lifestyle of a starving artist.

The best thing about assessments is that they can help the test taker narrow down the many choices they have. They are necessary. How else is a student supposed to be motivated enough to do what it takes to succeed?

Some people just want to get a job. A career is a better choice because at some point, advancement or ambition is expected or required to stay valuable to an organization. Assessment tests help by addressing both situations at a foundational level.

The Official Site of the ASVAB Testing Program. http://official-asvab.com/eligibility_res.htm

The Human Metrics Jung Typology Test, http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/jtypes2.asp

Human Metrics, http://www.humanmetrics.com

Rhett Jeppson, Associate Administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Veterans’ Business Development.

Albert R. Renteria, Founder and CEO at Albert R. Renteria Corporation and Southwest Veterans’ Business Resource Center.

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